Darwin: Cannibalism is Natural and Good for You

Cannibalism is perfectly natural, according to a 2003 study by the National Geographic magazine, a sister publication.

Scientists suggest that even today many of us carry a gene that evolved as protection against brain diseases that can be spread by eating human flesh.

That is not all it protects against, if you read the previous article!

Fried human, barbecued human, broiled human, raw human…were these items on the menu of the day for our prehistoric ancestors? Quite possibly, according to genetic researchers.


I personally prefer poached, as in poached off your property 🙂

A growing body of evidence, such as piles of human bones with clear signs of human butchery, suggests cannibalism was widespread among ancient cultures. The discovery of this genetic resistance, which shows signs of having spread as a result of natural selection, supports the physical evidence for cannibalism, say the scientists.

Emphasis added.


Examples of teeth marks on the bones of our ancestors.

The bones are appropriately housed in this famous Washington D.C. museum:

Can you guess which museum it is?

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About Head Hunter

CANNIBALISMTODAY :: THE Magazine for the Modern Totalitarian
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2 Responses to Darwin: Cannibalism is Natural and Good for You

  1. the whiner says:

    I personally prefer poached, as in poached off your property 🙂

    I didn’t find that funny at all. Besides, poaching is illegal in most states.

  2. Head Hunter says:

    Relax, we’re saving your children for dessert.

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